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America’s Most Stressful Cities

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It’s no secret that 2020 was a very stressful year for most people. At the beginning of the year, COVID-19 began to spread widely and was suspended by a spring ban. People have effectively moved to work and school education, and the shutdown of consumer patterns and the associated changes has caused economic shocks that confuse many sectors. A record number of Americans began applying for unemployment benefits and struggled to buy basic necessities such as food and housing. What’s more, the United States is in the midst of a tough, fiercely contested election cycle, and constant news coverage is adding to the mental burden on Americans. And, thanks to efforts to stop the epidemic of the coronavirus, much of the comfort people seek to relieve stress is exercise classes at the gym, evening outings at restaurants and concerts, religious services at the place of worship, and simple. Quality. Time with family and friends — Most of the last year, it was confused, transformed, or simply unavailable.

Although it feels like the most stressful last year, the United States is generally a stressful country. Gallup’s global polls show that Americans express feelings of stress, anxiety, and anger more often than the population of almost every other country. This is important because chronic stress disrupts the immune system, digestive system, cardiovascular system, sleep, and reproductive system, increasing susceptibility to serious conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. The high levels of stress in Americans may be one of the reasons the United States lags behind many other developed countries in terms of health and life expectancy.

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